Hiatus

September 14, 2009

Theology and Praxis is currently in hiatus.

In September Ian Packer discussed his paper Why I think most debates on the Lord’s Table miss the point or An Immodest Proposal for the Practice of the Lord’s Table: Toward a Neo-Anabaptist Recovery of the Ancient Christian Meal for the ‘People of the Way’ in a Postmodern, Australian Context: A Theological Primer

Abstract:

This brief study of the practice of the Lord’s Table comes from a systematic theology perspective and does not aim to be a comprehensive nor merely descriptive treatment of all relevant biblical material. Nevertheless, its grounding in a re-reading of the biblical material suggests that much systematic theological discussion has been shaped by misleading questions. Within the limits set, this paper seeks to introduce and illuminate various theological issues surrounding or arising from historical and contemporary discussion of the Lord’s Supper (or “Lord’s Table”/ “Holy Communion”/ “Eucharist”). Thus various theological, philosophical, methodological, contextual, and cultural questions are raised as well as issues of theological ethics, and their connection to some wider ecclesiological understandings in systematics/ dogmatics.

My main contention in this paper is that much systematic discussion of the Lord’s Supper is dominated by reactions to medieval Roman Catholicism and that a radical, ‘critical primitivist’ approach is required in order to recover important elements of Christian practice. Emboldened by the Reformation examples of Luther, Zwingli, and the Swiss Anabaptists, and 20th Century theologians Karl Barth and Emil Brunner, I move toward an ‘evangelical’ (gospel-shaped) revision of ecclesial practices along with a challenge to the idea of these practices as ‘sacraments.’ Some implications for Christian practice today are also briefly outlined. 

For a copy of Ian’s paper please email Theology and Praxis.

This month’s paper to be delivered at the Theology and Praxis breakfast is:

Why I think missional theology is the future of theology, or,

why I think theology must become missional or perish

By David W. Congdon Click on link for PDF version

The paper and online discussion can be found here. The following is a brief excerpt.

Theology must become missional or perish. That is my thesis. By “missional,” I refer to the recent development in theology which defines God as a “missionary God” who commissions a “missionary church.” Mission is first and foremost proper to the being of God, and secondarily a concept in ecclesiology. Both dimensions—the theological and ecclesiological—are grounded in the missional life history of Jesus Christ. The interest in missional theology arises in the wake of two realities: the rejection of colonialism, and the shift of Christianity’s global “center” from the Northern Hemisphere to the Southern Hemisphere. With these two modern developments, missional theology arises as a way of thinking theologically which is both post-colonial and sensitive to cultural particularity, without simply collapsing theology into a post-colonial anthropology. Instead, missional theology is steadfastly rooted in the Christian gospel of the triune God, and in the proclamation of humanity’s reconciliation with God in Jesus of Nazareth. Missional theology is missiological and ecclesiological by being first and foremost theological, speaking about the God of mission while also attending to the apostolic community of the church as those commissioned by God. My argument is (1) exegetical, (2) historical, and (3) dogmatic in nature, and I will proceed in that order as I make my case.

Welcome, Crucible:

http://www.crucible.org.au

WHY I THINK Series

Hello to all those interested in reading theology and discussing its implication for ministry,

Once a month, we gather to discuss theology or theologians and their impact or value for pastoral ministry and practise. The aim is that through meeting together and dialogue that this fosters and enhances our own ministries and gives us a broader understanding.

I would like to invite you to consider giving a presentation when we meet throughout the year. A presentation can be 15-20 minutes in length. The topic may be something you would like to introduce and discuss. Maybe something you are working on through your studies or a current focus or hobby horse. The title of your paper needs to begin with WHY I THINK… for example “Why I think Karl Barth is a better theologian than Carl Henry” or “Why I think Hauerwas is wrong.”

If you are interested please reply ASAP. We are hoping to begin in July and to meet in a fairly central Sydney location of either Parramatta (café) or West Ryde (pub). The meetings are on Saturday mornings, usually the third Saturday of the month from 10am to lunch. The proposed dates are:

July 19th

August 16th

September 20th

October 18th

November 15th

Please send your response and presentation title to theologyandpraxis@yahoo.com.au

Grace and Peace,

Michael Pailthorpe

https://theologyandpraxis.wordpress.com/

[Note: for those who live overseas or outside-of-Sydney and would like to participate. There are many ways that you can. Either directly through our blog or recording your presentation and we return the recorded discussion. In this technological age the possibilities are endless. Let me know if you’re keen.]

T. F Torrance and the Mediation of Reconciliation

The paper delivered by Michael Pailthorpe at our February meeting has been posted. This paper is a review of Ch.3 in Torannce’s The Mediation of Christ and is entitled “T.F Torrance and the Mediation of Reconciliation”.

Hello to all those interested in reading theology and discussing its implication for ministry,

Once a month, we gather to discuss contemporary/influential theology or theologians and their impact or value for pastoral ministry and practise. The aim is that through meeting together and dialogue that this fosters and enhances our own ministries and gives us a broader understanding. The basic format to guide the meeting is that a paper is presented that summarises or presents a particular theologian or theological niche which leads into a discussion of the associated benefits or the concerns. At the moment, we are working through a book by Thomas Forsyth Torrance (recently deceased) called The Mediation of Christ. The book is seemingly influential and has implications for the presentation of the gospel, our understanding of atonement and incarnation, Israel, Trinity and, of course, pastoral ministry. We are working through it chapter by chapter and will be finished either in May or June.

I would like to invite you to consider presenting a paper. The paper maybe something you would like to introduce and discuss. Maybe something you are working on through your studies or a current focus or hobby horse. The title of your paper needs to begin with WHY I THINK… for example Why I think Karl Barth is a better theologian than Carl Henry or Why I think Karl Barth is the anti-Christ. The papers, therefore, are to be an informed presentation of your argument with the added focus being on the implications for ministry. The papers should be around 2500-3500 words in length (or 30-45mins) and presented at the meeting. Though, if you live out side of Sydney or overseas and cannot make a meeting we ask for you to provide a recording of your lecture to coincide with a printed copy of your paper. We will record our discussion and send you a copy. Your paper will then be posted on the blog.

If you are interested please reply by May 17th. The meetings are on Saturday mornings, usually the third Saturday of the month from 10am to lunch. The proposed dates for future meetings are:

July 19th

August 16th

September 20th

October 18th

November 15th

December (TBA)

Please send your response and paper title by to theologyandpraxis@yahoo.com.au

Grace and Peace,

Michael Pailthorpe

https://theologyandpraxis.wordpress.com/

A review of Chapter 1, “The Mediation of Revelation” in Thomas F Torrance’s The Mediation of Christ by Rev Dr Alan Harley.

Many who attend our monthly reading and discussion group are acquainted with the works of T F Torrance. Therefore there are a number of us who were saddened to hear of his passing today. Eulogies celebrating the life and work of T F Torrance have been posted at the following sites.

Per Crucem Ad Lucem (Jason Goroncy) –  http://cruciality.wordpress.com/2007/12/02/thomas-forsyth-torrance-1913–2007/

Andy Goodliff – http://andygoodliff.typepad.com/my_weblog/2007/12/tf-torrance-191.html

Faith & Theology (Ben Myers) – http://faith-theology.blogspot.com/2007/12/thomas-f-torrance-1913-2007.html

Der Evangelische Theologe (W. Travis McMaken) – http://derevth.blogspot.com/2007/12/requiescat-in-pace-thomas-f-torrance.html

A eulogy by George Hunsinger  guest-posted at http://faith-theology.blogspot.com/2007/12/t-f-torrance-eulogy.html